17: California Transparency in Supply Chains Act

Dr. Sandra Morgan and Dave Stachowiak discuss the Transparency in Supply Chains Act that will become law in the State of California on January 1st, 2012. New legislation helps to ensure ethical labor practices and is beginning to help us combat human trafficking.

Key Points

  • Transparency in Supply Chains Act requires companies to disclose their efforts in ensuring that their direct supply chains are free of slavery and human trafficking.
  • Addressing slavery regarding the law of supply and demand through our consumer practices is good, but we need to also address legislation and laws to enforce slave-free supply chains.
  • We must consider the whole supply chain of the products we purchase, not just where it was made, but where the different materials where produced or grown.
  • If the consumer is knowledgeable about what kind of accountability the law is requiring, we can ask better questions to hold companies accountable.
  • Consumers have a responsibility to hold companies accountable, but also to hold ourselves accountable in our purchasing decisions.
  • Boycotting businesses is problematic when we don’t know exactly what products are produced using slave labor, and also because it may cost someone in America their job.
  • Training and capacity building is a key component to the effectiveness of the Transparency in Supply Chain Act.
  • The Act will result in improving the dignity and human rights of workers globally.

Resources

2015 California Transparency in Supply Chains Act

SB 657 Human Trafficking

Effective Supply Chain Accountability

U.S. Department of Labor’s List of Goods Produced by Child labor and Forced Labor

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andrewkroeger

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